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FAQ


  1. Why do I need a water softener?
  2. What does a water softener remove?
  3. What are the On The Go Water Softener dimensions?
  4. Is the water softener hard to install?
  5. Is the water softener hard to regenerate?
  6. Can the water softener be hooked up backwards?
  7. Why use table salt instead of rock salt?
  8. Will my water taste salty?
  9. Can I get parts for the water softener if needed?
  10. Can the On The Go Water Softener only be used on an RV?
  11. What Salt Do I Need to Use?
  12. What Makes Water Hard?
  13. Why Soft Water is an Advantage!
  14. How Does a Water Softener Work?
  15. Are You in a Hard Water Area?
  16. Do Softeners Prevent Rust & Scaling?
  17. Softeners and Filters - The Difference!
  18. What is Reverse Osmosis?
  19. How Long Does a Water Softener Last?
  20. Sodium Related Health Issues.
  21. How Much Sodium is Added to Water?

Why do I need a water softener?

A water softener removes harmful minerals from supply water therefore extending the life of plumbing fixtures and appliances. It also helps cut down on soap, shampoo, and detergent costs.
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What does a water softener remove?

A water softener removes calcium, magnesium, lime, and iron from supply water. By removing these minerals, you eliminate buildup in pipes, on fixtures, and in your RV water heater.
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What are the On The Go Water Softener dimensions?

This compact unit measures 6 ¾' in diameter by 22" in height. The water softener will soften approximately 300 gallons of water between regenerations depending on water hardness from the supply.
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Is the water softener hard to install?

No, quick connects are provided for easy installation and removal.
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Is the water softener hard to regenerate?

No, this unit regenerates with just a 1 pound box of table salt. You just shut off the water supply, unhook the outlet side of the water softener, twist off the tank cap, pour in the table salt, put the cap back on, turn on the water supply, and rinse the unit for about 15 minutes. This will complete the regeneration process.
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Can the water softener be hooked up backwards?

Yes, but don't worry. The On The Go Water Softener is manufactured so none of the resin can be lost. Inlets and outlets are conveniently marked for ease in installation.
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Why use table salt instead of rock salt?

Table salt dissolves quicker than rock salt therefore it will rinse from the water softener easier and faster.
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Will my water taste salty?

No, if the water softener is rinsed properly during regeneration.
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Can I get parts for the water softener if needed?

Yes, all parts are available from the manufacturer.
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Can the On The Go Water Softener only be used on an RV?

There are many uses for the water softener. It can be used to wash cars, mobile homes, houses, and anywhere soft water is needed.
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What Salt Do I Need to Use?

You will need everyday, ordinary table salt to regenerate the softener. You can purchase Morton salt, generic brands or store-name brands. They all work the same for the Portable Water SoftenerT and usually cost less than 25 cents per container. You can use plain or iodized salt, it doesn't matter!
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What Makes Water Hard?

Few things are harder on your family than hard water. It's hard on your clothes, your dishes, your pipes and your appliances. Fortunately, no one knows more about hard water and how to soften it than Morton® Salt. To find out more about hard water and how Morton can make your "hard" life a little easier, just select the topics from the menu below. So, what Makes Water Hard? The words "hard water" describe water that contains calcium and magnesium, the hardness minerals. Rain water begins as soft water, free of these minerals. As rain water passes over and through the earth, flowing into lakes, rivers, streams and ground water, it absorbs the hardness minerals. While these minerals aren't harmful to your health, they do affect the properties of water and its effectiveness for washing and cleaning.
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Why Soft Water is an Advantage!

Not only does soft water turn tough cleaning jobs into easy work, it also saves money and time. You need less soap to get clothes and dishes clean. You can say good-bye to annoying water scaling and soap scum as well as stubborn tub rings. Your pipes and appliances remain stain- and clog-free, requiring less maintenance and repair.
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How Does a Water Softener Work?

The principle behind water softening is really just simple chemistry. A water softener contains resin beads which hold electrically charged ions. When hard water passes through the softener, calcium and magnesium ions are attracted to the charged resin beads. It's the resulting removal of calcium and magnesium ions that produces "soft water." The diagram shows the exchange that takes place during the water softening process . 

 



Source: HowStuffWorks.com

We call water "hard" if it contains a lot of calcium or magnesium dissolved in it. Hard water causes two problems:

 


The solution to hard water is either to filter the water by distillation or reverse osmosis to remove the calcium and magnesium, or to use a water softener . Filtration would be extremely expensive to use for all the water in a house, so a water softener is usually a less costly solution.

The idea behind a water softener is simple. The calcium and magnesium ions in the water are replaced with sodium ions. Since sodium does not precipitate out in pipes or react badly with soap, both of the problems of hard water are eliminated. To do the ion replacement, the water in the house runs through a bed of small plastic beads or through a chemical matrix called zeolite . The beads or zeolite are covered with sodium ions. As the water flows past the sodium ions, they swap places with the calcium and magnesium ions. Eventually, the beads or zeolite contain nothing but calcium and magnesium and no sodium, and at this point they stop softening the water. It is then time to regenerate the beads or zeolite.

Regeneration involves soaking the beads or zeolite in a stream of sodium ions. Salt is sodium chloride , so the water softener mixes up a very strong brine solution and flushes it through the zeolite or beads (this is why you load up a ater softener with salt). The strong brine displaces all of the calcium and magnesium that has built up in the zeolite or beads and replaces it again with sodium. The remaining brine plus all of the calcium and magnesium is flushed out through a drain pipe.


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Are You in a Hard Water Area?

 

Few things are harder on your family than hard water. It's hard on your clothes, your dishes, your pipes and your appliances. Fortunately, no one knows more about hard water and how to soften it than Morton® Salt. To find out more about hard water and how Morton can make your "hard" life a little easier, just select the topics from the menu below.



Source: Morton Salt


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Do Softeners Prevent Rust & Scaling?

 

YES! Save money on harsh detergents, and stop working so hard to get rid of those ugly rust stains and scaling on your sinks, showers, and toilets.


What Does Scaling Look Like?

 

See the picture below for an example of "light" scaling. Most campgrounds and RV Parks have much harder water than your average home water supply. Protect your investment, and cut down on plumbing repair costs!


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Softeners and Filters - The Difference!

Filtering separates out and collects particles when water moves through a media. Water filters work great for removing sulfides and other particles that give water a bad flavor or odor. Filters are effective for small volumes of water. Filtering water, however, does not remove dissolved minerals, such as iron, calcium and magnesium. These dissolved minerals are removed by using a water softener as described in the How does a water softener work section.
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What is Reverse Osmosis?

 

Reference: www.howthingswork.com

To understand "reverse osmosis," it is probably best to start with normal osmosis. According to Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, osmosis is the "movement of a solvent through a semipermeable membrane (as of a living cell) into a solution of higher solute concentration that tends to equalize the concentrations of solute on the two sides of the membrane." That's a mouthful. To understand what it means, this picture is helpful:


On the left is a beaker filled with water, and a tube has been half-submerged in the water. As you would expect, the water level in the tube is the same as the water level in the beaker. In the middle figure, the end of the tube has been sealed with a "semipermeable membrane" and the tube has been half-filled with a salty solution and submerged. Initially, the level of the salt solution and the water are equal, but over time, something unexpected happens -- the water in the tube actually rises. The rise is attributed to "osmotic pressure."

semipermeable membrane is a membrane that will pass some atoms or molecules but not others. Saran wrap is a membrane, but it is impermeable to almost everything we commonly throw at it. The best common example of a semipermeable membrane would be the lining of your intestines, or a cell wall. Gore-tex is another common semipermeable membrane. Gore-tex fabric contains an extremely thin plastic film into which billions of small pores have been cut. The pores are big enough to let water vapor through, but small enough to prevent liquid water from passing (see this page for more information on Gore-tex fabric).

In the figure above, the membrane allows passage of water molecules but not salt molecules. One way to understand osmotic pressure would be to think of the water molecules on both sides of the membrane. They are in constant Brownian motion . On the salty side, some of the pores get plugged with salt atoms, but on the pure-water side that does not happen. Therefore, more water passes from the pure-water side to the salty side, as there are more pores on the pure-water side for the water molecules to pass through. The water on the salty side rises until one of two things occurs:

Osmosis, by the way, is why drinking salty water (like ocean water) will kill you. When you put salty water in your stomach, osmotic pressure begins drawing water out of your body to try to dilute the salt in your stomach. Eventually, you dehydrate and die.

In reverse osmosis, the idea is to use the membrane to act like an extremely fine filter to create drinkable water from salty (or otherwise contaminated) water. The salty water is put on one side of the membrane and pressure is applied to stop, and then reverse, the osmotic process. It generally takes a lot of pressure and is fairly slow, but it works.

Reverse osmosis is an excellent way to make small volumes of drinking water, and it is not cost effective for making everyday water for showers, dishwashers, washing machines and toilets.


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How Long Does a Water Softener Last?

The resin for our softeners have a life span of 7 to 9 years depending on the quality of water and the frequency of regeneration. When the old resin is replaced with new resin, the softener will last an another 7 to 9 years.

 


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Sodium Related Health Issues.

You can purchase Potassium Chloride Pellets to soften your water. Potassium Chloride Pellets are 99% sodium-free, therefore reducing sodium levels in your softened water. The only problem is that you will have to crush the Pellets into fine granules to put into the softener.
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How Much Sodium is Added to Water?

That depends on the hardness of the original water. This table shows the additional amount of sodium consumed by drinking one quart of softened water. Initial Hardness Sodium Added 1.0 grains per gallon 7.5 milligrams/quart 5.0 grains per gallon 37.5 milligrams/quart 10.0 grains per gallon 75.0 milligrams/quart 20.0 grains per gallon 150.0 milligrams/quart 40.0 grains per gallon 300.0 milligrams/quart As a comparison, one slice of white bread has 161 milligrams of sodium; 3/4 cup of canned baked beans = 1130 milligrams; 1 tablespoon of catsup = 204 milligrams; 1 medium frankfurter = 610 milligrams; and 1 cup of whole milk = 127 milligrams. Even a common Alka Seltzer tablet contains 532 milligrams of sodium. However, if you suffer from hypertension or are on a sodium restricted diet, you should consult your doctor about the proper water for drinking.
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